The social network for parents of kids with autism

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Discounts for Parents on Great Autism Workshops

At MyAutismTeam we believe that when your child is diagnosed with autism, it should be easy to find the best people around to help you.  With nearly 30,000 parents of kids with autism registering on MyAutismTeam in just over a year, we’re making it much easier to find and connect with other parents just like you.  Many of you have also told us that you’d like help getting access to other services – including parent education and training.   So we are experimenting with identifying and bringing the best autism workshops for parents to you  – and we are working to get you all a MyAutismTeam group discount to boot.  We’ll be testing this out regionally and looking for your feedback. To start, we’ve negotiated a $50 discount (use code MAT50) on a great parent seminar coming to the SF Bay Area:
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Accidental Insults & Other Social Hazards Facing the Adult with Asperger’s

We received a tremendous response to last week’s blog post titled, Temple Grandin on the Importance of Giving Kids with Autism a “50’s Upbringing“.  It was about helping kids with autism build job skills and Dr. Grandin’s view that the right foundation for building job skills begins early-on in a child’s life by helping him or her learn manners, basic social skills, doing things for others, and basic responsibilities.   This week we fast forward to adolescence and adulthood and focus on the challenges some people on the autism spectrum have processing and interpreting social interactions.  Dr. Michael McManmon has an inside perspective on this topic as he himself was diagnosed with Asperger’s late in adulthood, after raising his own children.   He now runs a program designed to help young adults with Asperger’s successfully manage the transition from high school to college – and also focuses on making sure his students are building job skills.    Dr. McManmom gave us a lot of great advice as we were getting MyAutismTeam off the ground.   In this guest blog, re-used with permission from Psychology Today, Dr. McManmom offers a very personal glimpse into the challenges he faced in processing social interactions and how he has learned to manage them. – Eric
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Temple Grandin on the Importance of Giving Kids with Autism a “50’s Upbringing”

Friday night I had the honor of meeting Dr. Temple Grandin – the noted cattle expert, autism authority, and one of the most famous and successful people on the autism spectrum.  We were both speaking at the US Autism & Asperger Association Conference in Denver and when we met at the speaker’s dinner I told Temple, “I am the co-founder of MyAutismTeam – a social network for parents of kids with autism.”
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Meet MyAutismTeam In Denver Sept. 6-9, 2012

Meet Us At the USAAA Conference

The US Autism and Asperger Association conference starts Thursday Sept. 6th and concludes Sunday Sept. 9th. Among the many notable speakers, like Temple Grandin, MyAutismTeam co-founder & CEO Eric Peacock will be presenting “10 Lessons Learned from 25,000 Parents”  on Saturday at 1PM.
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Is it worth getting diagnostic tests for autism spectrum disorders?

Are you a parent exploring the current genetic tests available for autism? If so, it turns out you’re not alone. 

Three months ago while attending the Stanford University Autism Symposium, I had the good fortune of listening to a panel discussion about genetic testing in autism.  The panel was titled, “Diagnostic or Treatment Value of Genetic Testing for Autism Spectrum Disorders” and it was hosted by three brilliant, compassionate, dedicated autism experts – Drs. Joachim Hallmayer, Jonathan Bernstein and Wendy Froehlich.  These folks had a tough job.  As the three experts in a room filled with 30-40 eager parents of children with autism, they had to portray the hope and potential of genetic diagnostic testing in autism, while simultaneously explaining how little it can actually do for parents right now.
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School’s Out for Summer — But Fears of Regression Looms for Parents of Kids with Autism

“I Hate Summer” was a recent post by Laura Rossi Totten on The Huffington Post. She writes,

Special Needs Parenting is challenging 365 days of the year. Unlike the shorter winter break or spring vacation, summer is unique because it is long and most special needs children now expect the routine, support, predictability and familiarity of the school year. Frequently, school-age special needs children struggle with the concept of time and that contributes to the confusion and anxiety many children experience during these three months.

What’s a parent to do? What options exist?

For parents who are looking for ways to keep their kids progressing (whether they’re Aspies, high-functioning, or non-verbal), there are few inexpensive options to turn to during the summer months. We recently spoke with Robyn Catagnus, EdD, BCBA-D of Rethink Autism to learn more about the online curriculum they offer parents.
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Are You Missing Out On This 1-Day Conference for Bay Area Autism Parents?


Get PRACTICAL information that can help with parenting your child diagnosed with ASD at the one-day Annual ASD Symposium: Translating Science into Treatment Stanford Autism Center.This one-day event on Saturday, May 12th will be full of useful sessions to help you:

  • address feeding and digestive issues
  • decode your child’s most difficult behaviors
  • address sleep issues
  • learn more about adaptive skills for your teenager
  • know your legal rights when it comes to special needs in schools
  • translate the science of sensory, motor coordination, and speech pathology

BONUS: receive $25 off the price of admission if you’re one of the first 10 parents to email support@myautismteam.com. (Total cost after discount is $75.00).

Please share with other Bay Area parents. Our goal is to continuously bring you more discounts to events, products or services that empower you to help your child thrive.


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